Barbara M. Britton interview

AUTHOR INTERVIEW


A little introduction:

Barbara M. Britton lives in Southeast, Wisconsin and loves the snow—when it accumulates under three inches. She writes Christian Fiction from Bible Times to present day. Her Tribes of Israel series brings little-known Bible characters to light. She also authored a WWI Historical set in Alaska. Barbara has a nutrition degree from Baylor University but loves to dip healthy strawberries in chocolate.


When did your love of books begin?

I have always enjoyed reading, but I never dreamed that I would become an author. I enjoyed creative writing and did well in my writing classes in high school. Unfortunately, none of my teachers encouraged a career in writing, or to pursue writing in college. I definitely needed more classes in grammar.


When did you start to have the wish to become an author?

I taught elementary school chapel for many years. I suffered some teacher burnout at the end of the school year and sent a quick prayer to God to send me some creativity. I was hoping to finish my lesson plans, yet I had a prompting to sit down and write a story. Interestingly enough, my fist three manuscripts were general fiction. It wasn’t until I wrote my fourth book that I put what I taught into a book—a story similar to a Bible story. I sold my fourth book to a Christian publisher and continued to write Christian Fiction, mostly Biblical Fiction.


How have you found the process for becoming an author?

My publishing process took many years. I finished my first manuscript in 2008 and I received my first book contract in 2015. The book contract was for the fourth book I had written.

I needed the time between finishing my first manuscript and selling my first book, to learn the craft of writing and also build the business side to my writing brand. Some may call the business side of writing your platform or social media imprint.

I wouldn’t trade the learning process and the relationships I made for anything. They are invaluable to me in my author life.


What would you say to those wanting to become an author?

I would repeat the advice I learned from my first class on publishing.

-join a professional writing organization and get involved in the local chapter.

-attend writing conferences to learn the craft of writing and network with other writers.

-personally, I say, put away money for writing conferences, classes, building websites, and for the swag and promotion you will need when your book goes public.

There is a time for everything under heaven (Ecclesiastes 3:1), so I knew I wouldn’t get published one day sooner, or one day later, than God ordained. My critique partner used Dori’s phrase in “Finding Nemo,” just keep swimming.


Tell us about your book/books:

Most of my books bring to light little-known Bible characters. I find stories in the Bible that have been hidden for far too long and write about the heroism of men and women that can inspire us today. I also love history and have written a WWI novel highlighting the hardships of wounded military servicemembers.




What do you love about the writing/reading community?

The writing and reading communities have been supportive of my work and have encouraged me on days when the daunting task of writing a book dampens my enthusiasm. Writing happens best in community. I don’t think I would be where I am today without the support of my personal writing community and family.


If you could say anything to your readers what would it be?

I would thank my readers for spending their time and money on my books. I hope they are entertained and learn something new from my stories. My readers are a blessing to me.


Where can people connect with you?

You can find out more about my books on my website, barbarambritton.com, or follow me on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. Just look for the @BarbaraMBritton


Comments

  1. Thank you for hosting me. I hope readers find my writing tips helpful.

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